eMirror Vol 25, No. 41 (2021-10-08)

Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi demonstrating enso, 1988, Zazen-ji
Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi demonstrating enso,
1988, Zazen-ji


eMirror Vol 25, No. 41

Friday, October 8th, 2021
Edited by the Practice Council

The White Wind Zen Community:
An international community practising and teaching Dogen’s Zen since 1985.



The Dharma is not merely a philosophical system, it is not a way of thinking or feeling about our lives, it is not a “way of life” as some would say; rather it is a way to open to this great question and to live as the answering. Out of all of the various forms that Dharma has taken over the millennia, the one that has often been regarded as the most practical about this is called Zen. Sometimes we are so practical about this that we can seem to be austere and the practice can seem to be astringent. And yet, more than any other form of Dharma and in fact more than any other movement in human history Zen has always been closely associated with the arts, with elegance, with dignity, with humour, with richness and vividness.

The legendary Transmission from Sakyamuni Buddha to Mahakasyapa consisted of him holding up a flower and blinking and Mahakasyapa seeing and smiling. The Transmission from Hongren to Huineng centred around a verse. Much of the history of Chinese Chan is found in the spatters and slashes of black ink on rice paper, the emergence of distinctive new literary forms such as the yulu or recorded sayings of the Masters, and the verses and koan that they wrote or that were recorded about them. Our great founder Zen Master Eihei Dogen Kigen was a calligrapher and painter, he clarified the chants and liturgies used in monastic training, emphasized the bodily nature of continuous practice, appreciated incense and tea, raised the activity of cooking to one of central importance, was an accomplished storyteller, poet, and intellectual.

Why? Zen is a process of questioning into the very nature of our experiencing not one of becoming an artist. What is the relationship between Zen and the arts? Do we have to be an artist to deeply practice Zen? Or if we wake up, will we be able to play the violin? Or perhaps we might fear that as our practice continues we will no longer want to play the violin. All of these perspectives arise from the skewed vision of self-image and its stories about itself, its tales of identity. We feel that we are this or that kind of person.

-Ven Anzan Hoshin roshi, continuing Class One: "Flowering of the Senses" in the series "Zen Arts: The Flowering of the Senses", October 1999 Daruma-ki O-sesshin, Dainen-ji.
 


Upcoming Events



Fusatsu: 
October 20th and November 3rd.

Hermitage:
The Roshi is currently in an extended period of "self-isolation" due to underlying health issues until the COVID-19 situation clarifies.

Beginning Instruction in Zen Practice:
For information concerning our Long-distance Training Program, please visit this Web Page: https://wwzc.org/long-distance-training-program
 


Samu Weekend Report
by Ven. Saigyo ino



Over the weekend of Saturday, September 25th and Sunday, September 26th we held a Samu Weekend to continue with the project in the grounds to build rock gardens to replace the water garden. Although we had to keep the numbers of participants quite low during the on-going pandemic, a tremendous amount of work was done to move rock, build new pathways and add soil and mulch to the newly built beds. Thank you to the Roshi and Jinmyo sensei for all of their design input to the layout of the grounds and to the Sensei for making the lovely midday meals enjoyed by those students who stayed for the full days of work. Thank you to the following students for offering samu over the two days: Mishin godo, Fushin shramon, Ryoshin, Leonardo Nobrega, David Gallant, Chantal Maheu, Tarik Kaya, Carol Hodgson, George Donovan, Sarah Goul, Jesse Steinburg, Loic-Alexandre Ouellette, Kathleen Johnson, Shannon Morphew, Matt Broda, Marc Valade, Sam MacFarlane and Jean-Francois St-Louis. 
 


Request for assistance with landscaping in the front garden



A large project to landscape the front gardens is underway at Dainen-ji after the water gardens were removed due to damage and the amount of yearly upkeep required to keep it functional. Much work has already been done but there is still a great deal to do, so if any students can offer time to assist with this project please write to Saigyo ino at saigyo.cross@gmail.com. Thank you. 
 


Retreats



Deshi Isshin sat the 7-day O-sesshin in her home in Saint John, New Brunswick, in alignment with the monastery schedule. 

Rev. Chiso Tzelnic anagarika sat her weekly partial retreat on Tuesday, October 5th, at her home in Cambridge MA. Beth Buerkle sat a one-day retreat on Thursday, September 30th at her home Chamcook, New Brunswick. Julien Jefferson sat a half-day retreat on Thursday, September 30th at his home in Ottawa, Ontario. Brian Lakeman sat a half-day retreat on Sunday, October 3rd at his home in Brampton, Ontario. 

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, it is not possible at this time to schedule retreats in the monastery. If you would like to sit a retreat at home please follow the schedule outlined in this page:  https://wwzc.org/retreat-schedule-public-students.
 


Recorded Teachings Schedule


Saturday, October 9th to Saturday, October 16th

Saturday, October 9th: "Drawn In, Moving Forth": Zen Master Anzan Hoshin's Commentaries on Eihei Dogen zenji's “Bendowa: A Talk on Exerting the Way”: "Reading of Bendowa part two" (2 of 28)
Sunday, October 10th: "SAkN “Root Cycle One” by Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi: “Space” (teisho 2 of 6)
Monday, October 11th: “Every Breath You Take” by Ven. Shikai Zuiko o-sensei: "Seeing a Tall Tree" (Dharma Talk 58)
Thursday, October 14th: "The Touchstone 21, Mahavairocana (part 1)" by Ven. Jinmyo Renge sensei
Saturday, October 16th: "Drawn In, Moving Forth": Zen Master Anzan Hoshin's Commentaries on Eihei Dogen zenji's “Bendowa: A Talk on Exerting the Way”: "Reading of Bendowa part three" (3 of 28)
 


Listening to Teisho and Dharma Talks



​Associate and general students should continue to follow the recorded Teachings schedule for the sitting you were attending at the monastery, and listen to that during your home practice.

You can access the online Recorded Teachings Library at wwzc.org/recorded-teachings-schedule. 

You can also use the streaming site at app.wwzc.org to live stream recordings from the online Library. If you have forgotten your password or need assistance with accessing the recorded Teachings, please email schedule@wwzc.org.

Please note that teisho should be listened to in the correct order and with none missed out as themes, metaphors, questions raised and answered evolve in spirals throughout the series.

 

Photograph of Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi at Daijozan, mid-1980s, by Ven. Shikai Zuiko sensei
Photograph of Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi at Daijozan, mid-1980s,
by Ven. Shikai Zuiko sensei


Translations



Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi has recently completed translation work on some shorter texts by Eihei Dogen zenji from the Shobogenzo. The work on these particular texts is based upon the literal translations that he worked on with Joshu Dainen roshi at Hakukaze-ji around 1977-78 followed by many years of putting them down, picking them up, and polishing. Naturally, more essential texts such as Uji, Genjokoan, Shinjin Gakudo and some 40 others were completed first and have been given extensive commentaries by the Roshi. This batch of texts includes Baike: Plum Blossoms, Ryugin: Howling Dragon, and Udonge: The Udumbara Blossoming and many others are nearing completion. Many of these will be posted on our website over the next few months.
 


Newly-Presented Teachings



During the January 2020 Sesshin, Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi presented the following teisho as part of the ongoing series, "The Lineage of Luminosity: Part Two: The Lineage in China”:
          January 11th: “Rujing's Broken Broom of Mu”.
During the December 2019 Rohatsu O-sesshin, Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi presented the following teisho as part of the ongoing series, "The Lineage of Luminosity, Part Two: The Lineage in China”:
          December 2nd: Rujing’s Plum Blossoms Again
          December 3rd: Rujing’s Flower for Pindola
          December 4th: Rujing’s Painting Plum Blossoms
          December 5th: Rujing’s Frogs and Worms
Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi presented the following teisho during the November Sesshin, as part of the ongoing series, "The Lineage of Luminosity: Part Two: The Lineage in China”:
          November 9th: Rujing and the Old Plum Tree
 


Dharma Talk by Ven. Jinmyo Renge sensei Posted on the WWZC Website



Dharma Talk Presented by Ven. Jinmyo Renge sensei on the occasion of receiving Inka: “Receiving the Dharma Seal: Hekiganroku Case 2: Zhaozhou’s ‘The Vast Way is Without Difficulty’”, Dainen-ji, Sogaku O-sesshin, Thursday May 20th 2021.
Read the transcript: Receiving the Seal
Listen to the recording (accessible only to students of this Lineage): Receiving the Seal
 


Recorded Teachings for Public Access



While most of the online Recorded Teachings library is password-protected and only accessible to students of Zen Master Anzan Hoshin, a small selection of MP3 recordings of teisho are accessible to the public at https://wwzc.org/recorded-teachings. Additional recordings will be uploaded periodically.

MP3 recordings of five teisho are currently available:

Dharma Position https://wwzc.org/dharma-position
Eyes See, Ears Hear https://wwzc.org/eyes-see-ears-hear
Embarrassment https://wwzc.org/embarrassment
Ven. Anzan Hoshin roshi's reading of his translation of Eihei Dogen zenji's “Bendowa: A Talk on Exerting the Way” https://wwzc.org/bendowa-talk-exerting-way

 

scroll


Painted Cakes
(do not satisfy hunger)

Begun by Ven. Shikai Zuiko o-sensei
Finished by Rev. Fushin Comeau shramon following her death



Continuing on with “Painted Cakes: A Zen Dictionary” a limited edition text written by Anzan Hoshin roshi in the 1980s and last revised in 1994.

Shukuen (J) Residual connections or background from previous lives.

Posted October 1st, 2021. New entries are posted every two weeks.
 

Oryoki set drawing


Office of the Tenzo



Dogen zenji taught in the Tenzo kyokun: Instructions for the Tenzo (https://wwzc.org/dharma-text/tenzo-kyokun-instructions-tenzo) that the work of preparing and serving meals is "a matter for realized monks who have the mind of the Way or by senior disciples who have roused the Way-seeking mind." In alignment with this, part of Zen Master Anzan Hoshin's samu for the Community involves personally overseeing the activities of the ancient office of tenzo. Ven. Jinmyo Renge sensei serves as tenzo and Mishin godo and Saigyo ino offer assistance as tenzo-anja. The following meals were prepared for residents on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

The following meals were prepared for O-sesshin Participants:

Saturday:
Breakfast
: Fried biryani rice (biryani rice left over from Thursday evening’s meal, sauteed spanish onion and poblano); scrambled eggs.
Lunch: Calrose rice; miso shiru (kombu stock, shiro miso, ginger, shoyu, mirin, rice vinegar, silken tofu, rehydrated shitake mushrooms); takuan and gari.
Supper: Mushroom pasta (farfalle pasta, sliced cremini mushrooms sauteed in butter with diced onion, red wine, soy sauce, fresh thyme from the monastery roof garden, salt and pepper; small amount of cream); “greens and beans” (chopped kale cooked on the griddle with thickly sliced spanish onion, red bell peppers, red kidney beans, balsamic vinegar, apple cider vinegar, black pepper, salt); tomato salad (tomato spears mixed with olive oil and fresh basil).

Sunday:
Breakfast: Fried pasta (leftover mushroom pasta fried with chopped leftover kale and red kidney beans).
Lunch: Mixed ​white and brown jasmine rice topped with diced daikon sauteed in chile sauce; seaweed soup (strained miso shiru broth, wakame seaweed, julienned ginger, shoyu, monastery made Szechuan chile oil, mirin); kimchi.​
Supper: Algamja-jorim (baby potatoes braised in soy sauce and sugar); Napa cabbage soup (chopped Napa cabbage simmered with minced garlic, sliced jalapenos, doenjang (Korean soybean paste), gochujang (chile paste), flour, and water); Korean spicy lettuce salad (chopped romaine lettuce and thinly sliced white onion dressed with soy sauce, minced garlic, minced scallion, white vinegar, sugar, gochugaru (hot pepper flakes), sesame seeds, sesame oil). 

Monday
Breakfast: Potato fried rice (leftover chopped algamja-jorim potatoes fried with leftover jasmine rice and garnished with scallions); scrambled eggs.
Lunch: Mixed grain (calrose and arborio rice); miso shiru (kombu stock, shiro miso, ginger, shoyu, mirin, rice vinegar, silken tofu, rehydrated shitake mushrooms); takuan and gari.
Supper: Jasmine Rice; Thai red curry (chopped Spanish onion, red bell and poblano peppers, coconut milk, brown sugar, lime juice, soy sauce); Asian pear with lime juice and Chile flakes.

Tuesday:
Breakfast: Fried rice (leftover chopped Thai curry fried together with leftover jasmine rice and kashmiri chiles).
Lunch: Mixed ​white and brown jasmine rice topped with diced daikon sauteed in chile sauce and slivered scallions; seaweed soup (strained miso shiru broth, wakame seaweed, julienned ginger, shoyu, monastery-made Szechuan chile oil, mirin); kimchi.​
Supper: Lundberg brown rice mixed with butter and green peas; butternut squash soup (cooked and pureed butternut squash, yellow onion, and carrot, curry powder, cream); cubed friulano cheese and gherkins.

Wednesday:
Breakfast: Fried rice (leftover Lundberg brown rice, chopped Spanish onion, poblano and anaheim peppers, ground cumin); scrambled eggs.
Lunch: Calrose rice; miso shiru (kombu stock, shiro miso, ginger, shoyu, mirin, rice vinegar, silken tofu, rehydrated shitake mushrooms); takuan and gari.
Supper:  Rice salad (mixed Lundberg brown, white basmati and Chinese rice, brown lentils, chopped tomatoes, celery, minced red onion, feta cheese, fresh thyme, parsley and basil from the roof garden, olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, pepper); tomato soup (sauteed onion, garlic, red wine, minced sun dried tomatoes and thyme pureed with vegetable juice and mixed with caramelized onions); green and black onions with artichoke hearts and lemon zest.

Thursday:
Breakfast: Scallion congee (calrose and arborio rice, slivered ginger, chopped scallions, minced coriander stems, sesame oil, shoyu, white pepper); scrambled eggs.
Lunch: Mixed ​white and brown jasmine rice with peanuts; seaweed soup (strained miso shiru broth, wakame seaweed, julienned ginger, shoyu, handmade Szechuan chile oil, mirin); kimchi.​
Supper: Potato and cheese pierogies (boiled then fried on the griddle in butter with paprika, salt, and black pepper); garlic green beans (blanched green beans fried with lots of minced garlic); lime tofu (semi-firm tofu sauteed in butter, then braised in a sauce made from lime juice, “Dom’s Hot Chili Sauce”, garlic and onion powder, small amount of brown sugar). 

 

Monk in gassho - drawing

Thank You



If you would like to thank someone for a contribution they have made, please feel free to send an email to Jinmyo osho at rengezo at Gmail dot com, but be sure to type "eMirror" in the subject line.

From Mishin godo:
Thank you to the Roshi for dokusan and the entirety of the Lineage of Luminosity series of recorded teisho which we have just finished listening to (part one The Lineage in India; part two The Lineage in China; and part three The Lineage in Japan). Thank you to Jinmyo sensei for dokusan, for designing the meals for the O-sesshin and for preparing the tofu dish on Thursday evening and making sure the meal was ready. Thank you to Saigyo Ino for organizing the samu assignments for the week.